5 Things to Keep in Mind as Recruiting Season Approaches

College recruiting season is just around the corner, and the competition is tight! We chatted with women's lacrosse recruiting expert Joanna Lignelli, a level 1, 2, and 3 master trainer with U.S. Lacrosse and William and Mary (D1) alum, for her advice on how to get noticed by college coaches and recruiters.

Here are five things to keep in mind as recruiting season approaches:

1. At the college level, excelling in one skill may not be not enough.

Super speed…incredible stick coordination…insane strength…impressive lacrosse knowledge. In high school, being known for just one of those skills might have been enough. At the college level, the players that stand out are those who demonstrate ability in multiple skill areas. Coaches are looking for well-rounded players.

2. Be ridiculously organized.

Make lists. Lists of tournaments, colleges, on-campus clinics, schedules, coach contact information - the works. Attend on-campus camps and clinics. Send out tournament schedules to coaches as soon as you have an accurate date, time, and location (they are getting lots of other invites – you will want to book them before it’s too late). Make notes on your interactions with different coaches so that you can personalize future communication.

3. Your video could make or break you – take steps to get it right.

Your video should showcase your ability to perform in a competitive environment. Don’t select film from a game against an easy opponent to make yourself look good. Choose film from a game that shows that you can deliver at a competitive level.

Some technical tips:

- Use a digital camera or video camera.

- If you can hire a professional to shoot the footage, consider making that investment.

- Record on mute. 

- 1/3 of the field should be visible in the shot at all times so that the person viewing the film can see the field and off-ball movement.

- Don’t zoom. Zooming makes the image grainy and takes the play out of context.  

4. Pay attention to your behavior and attitude at all times.

Consider: When you make a mistake, how do you recover? When you don’t have the ball, are you working to assist your teammates? When you get taken out of the game, how do you react? After a turnover, do you re-defend? How do you treat officials, coaches, teammates, and members of the opposing team?

5. Be an advocate for yourself.

The recruiting process is a time for evaluation on both sides. Evaluate the respectability of coaching staff and leadership. Observe team dynamics and determine the best fit for you. Remember, it is very important to consider other factors such as college location, academic rigor, and institutional values. The entire college – not just the team – should be a good fit for you.

Take a mental break from the stress of training and college searching and read the 15 Things Only Girls Who Play Lacrosse Will Understand.